Tag Archives: drills

Training Tip 2

Verbal and Body language Training Tip

 

Use firm tone of voice, not aggressive, learn to calm your emotional trigger response while talking to an aggressive individual. Never tell someone to calm down. What to say depends on the context and gravity of the situation, so think before talking. Learn to use proper body language, make it so it does not appear aggressively challenging or dominating nor does it make you appear as someone to be bullied and dominated, it should be strong enough to convey you’re not someone who will be victimized without a fight (if necessary). Never use challenging terms such as “What are you going to do? Kill me? Hit me?” etc. etc. Give clear verbal commands. Keep your eyes in all possible directions to detect an anomaly; i.e. multiple assailants, concealed weapon/s, witnesses, escapes. No direct eye contact, but don’t look down, look straight, not up, chin should not be up, that showcases pride and territory dominance. Don’t take a fighting stance. Don’t stand too close to the other individual and don’t let them get close to you, it’s an invitation for a sucker punch or a stab. In a social situation, try to give the other individual an out to save face in front of their peers. Try and calm the individual by letting them know the fight isn’t worth the reward (this can backfire if not phrased properly).

 

Tell your training partner to not act like one and be aggressive in verbal language with you. To scare you and activate the stress response in you, to provoke you emotionally and try to get you angry, to activate adrenaline and as a result, your Flight, Fight or Freeze response. Play ambient sounds here as well, while doing the scenario, as you need to be used to the distractions that will occur in an actual social setting, the surrounding noises, yells, screams, etc will distract you and that might be the moment you get the first hit. So train to be more focused on the threat, while being focused on the surroundings. Pay attention to the sounds in the background while talking. Remember them, then after, describe them at the end of the training. See how accurate you are. You need to be able to multitask. Try creating some other physical distractions as well, get some people to walk by or try and get your attention to distract you, see how focused you can remain while talking to the main threat. This will also help you remember things better during and after the situation. It can help you describe the situation better in the aftermath when you’re being debriefed by the police officer on scene.

 

There are a lot more details and much more to this, but this covers the very fundamental level training tips you can utilize to deescalate a situation that doesn’t need to get worse.

 

For avoidance, just don’t go to places or hang out with individuals who are always looking for a reason to fight and you’ll be safe.

 

Well, that’s it. Thanks for reading. Any questions or want to ask more details on this training tip, write them down in the comments.

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Training Tip

I’m gonna keep this one short. This is just a training drill I used to do to train for physical violence. Any questions or doubts or details you wanna know about, write them down in the comments down below and I’ll answer them.

 

Workout till muscle fatigue (not injury), get tired, get adrenalized, then do scenario training. Don’t wipe off the sweat, don’t hydrate, play loud music or just ambient sounds, dim the lights or turn them off, depending on the context of the scenario you’re gonna do. Make sure, your training partner doesn’t act like one and comply. Make sure the simulated assault is an ambush. Make sure you do it in a confined space with one exit. Train in a car, bus, train, etc. Do it in different terrains and in different seasons at different time of day. Make sure the assault taking place is at least around 60-70% force. (May/will require some sort of training gear). Use weapons. Involve everyday objects. Add multiple threats. Dynamics will change according to the location, and the type of situation you’re training for.

I used to do this (before my injuries) and change it up according to the situation we were training for. If you have injuries that you don’t want to bring back up, I’d recommend you to avoid this training or just tone some of the things down that might make the injuries worse.

Caution: There are side effects of over-working muscles. So, never work till failure or to the point of injury, just till you’re extremely tired and breathing heavily and sweating immensely. Injury just leads to regress, you’ll just waste your time with an injury. Cardio, HIIT workouts can be good before this type of training drill.

Remember, at the end of the day, you’re a civilian and not a professional who deals with violence on a daily basis as a part of your job, so you can avoid majority of the threats and violent situations by staying away from such people who look for an opportunity and a reason to commit violence against others.

 

Well, that’s it. Thanks for reading. Any questions? Write them down in the comments section below.