Tag Archives: psychology

Recollection Drill

Another fb post turned blog post…*sigh* It’s becoming a habit now..

So, do this if you want to know whether you will recall every part of your training in a stressful situation. Give yourself or ask someone else to give you a random series of numbers, single, double, triple digits, for example 4-15-23-39-110-180. Then wait 15 minutes or so and focus on doing something else, it doesn’t matter what, anything that gets your mind off this, that will simulate you going about your day after training. Then do a high intensity workout, this will simulate your tiredness after a work day. Focus on the workout only, nothing else. Do it for at least 30-45 minutes. Then towards the end of the workout and after it, try and recall the sequence that was given to you, and then recall it in reverse. If you can do that flawlessly, meaning you don’t write it down or constantly think about it and stress on it and still be able to recall them within 10-15 seconds, chances are good that you’ll be able to recall a lot of information accurately in very less time during a stressed situation. If you don’t, which most can’t, you should try making your training more principle based rather than technique based. Because there is no way you can ever recall every technique you learned for every different situation within the time frame that will be provided in an actual stress based situation. I used to do that all the time and still do it sometimes, it’s useful in improving memory as well btw.

Update- Just to be clear, I’m aware that physical recollection memory differs from  pattern recognition memory. My point with this is to show that the more data you have to recall, the longer it takes and the efficiency of memory recollection drops, as in, the data recalled is either inaccurate or incomplete. It is much quicker for the brain to recall a generalization than a specific bit of information.

 

Try it! Find out how well your memory recollection works in a stressful situation 🙂

Psychological Resistance

FB post turned blog post.

One of the most effective ways to cultivate psychological resistance to your environment is detachment from the factors causing stress.

This is applicable to those who can’t escape their harsh, stressful environments.

Before doing something like that, remember three things though;
1- It’s easier said than done. Takes a lot of forceful avoidance (will).

2- There are extreme side-effects like anti-social behavior, lack of social skills, anxiety, depression, emotional imbalance and loss of empathy, with prolonged application.

3- If not kept in check, i.e. if you constantly keep detaching yourself from everything you ‘don’t like’, you will alter your brain in a way that even the smallest things will cause you to lash out or you will become completely desensitized to all stimuli, including any emotion of joy. It’s only truly useful for those extreme stress situations, not your day-to-day issues.

Thoughts

So, I was reading an article about an incident, then moved on to comments and saw many people just recommending many different opinions than what was stated.

Then while I was in the shower, mid shower, it made me think up a question and a possible answer to it.

So, here it is;

Did you know that words can expand and contract?

Yes, you read that right. Words, before becoming words, are thoughts, and usually after becoming words are actions.

Remember the term “It’s easier said than done”? Well, it’s because when those words are thoughts. they’re contracted in our head, but expand exponentially when materialized.

Let’s take an example here; “I will climb mount Everest”. Now, think this sentence in your mind. Now see yourself on top of that mountain. Just standing at 29,000 ft. How easy it was to do that, easy enough, right? No doubts about just thinking of you doing it.

Now say the same thing out loud, and ask yourself if you truly believe that you’ll do it. The task, now that you have said it out loud seems more out of reach than you thought it, correct? Bordering on ridiculous.

Now, try doing it. Try climbing mount Everest tomorrow or in a month. Oops! Can’t do it, can you?

That’s what i mean when I say that words can expand and contract. This happens because the more effort you have to put in, the harder the task will be to accomplish.

Since thinking and imagining you doing something doesn’t require much physical or psychological effort it is the easiest task, but when you start saying it, you require more effort than thinking, it will require more processing power of your brain, more physical power of your mouth, etc etc. so now it will start to seem harder to you, now moving on to doing it, well, it will put tremendous stress on your body and mind, as a result, the task, by the time you go from thinking to doing it, will seem nigh impossible, as it has expanded to something much more than an abstract concept.

This would explain the behavior of many armchair quarterbacks and back seat drivers. Thinking is easy (for some), but doing it, putting it into action is a whole another thing.

This would also explain many people who judge other people’s actions in an assault or a police arrest situation. “Oh why did he have to do that, that was unnecessary”. In their minds, it’s an easy task to not injure, kill, etc and still come out unscathed. Because the words are easily said, without knowing the context, full story, etc. It doesn’t require much effort, just like the thought process of an average individual. Thoughts pop up, words are said, but when it comes the time to act on them, virtually no one will do what they said.

Anyway, just something to think about. Maybe I’m wrong or maybe I’m overthinking it too much.